Posts Tagged With: Yarn

My self installed yarn twists

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So I plaited my own yarn twists, for the third time and if I do say so myself, they came out even better than last time.

My twists in 2013My yarn twists in 2013, were a thinner and shorter and took me about three days to put in.

I really wanted to do thicker and longer twists than the last time, but the thought of sitting for three days put me off. However, this time it took me less time, and I was pleased with the result.

My process

1. I bought a lot of wool, in the end I used about 8 rolls. I bought black and a bit of brown, so I could mix the two (looks more natural with my hair). Wool is easy to find and quite cheap, the wool sold in supermarkets is ideal for yarn braids. Other tools needed are a pair of scissors, lighter (and candle, I just find that easier) and a lot of patience.

I washed my hair, conditioned it, made sure to use protein as I always do before I put in a protective style. I then separated my hair into smaller sections of front sides, back sides, back centre, middle and fringe front.

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Sectioning

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Started from the back

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When tired…


    2. Had to section the wool too, into the length I wanted, which is another tedious      process. To plait one braid, I had 20 length pieces of wool, which I would then        bend in half to plait. With installing on to the hair, I started off with a three strand  braid ( I haven’t mastered doing the twist right from the scalp yet, although this  looks more natural).

 I twisted starting from the back, then sides, front and finished off with the middle.  When I got tired or needed to go out during this two day process, I used a scarf to cover the front.

 

 

 

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Still left with the middle at this stage

 

3. For the ends, I’d burn them using a candle.

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Done!

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This is after about 3 weeks



I kept them in for about 4 weeks, although I would have kept them for 6 if my strands would just stay put.
I washed them twice, although I was worried about my hair locing when it shrunk in the twists, thankfully it wasn’t a hassle at all to undo.

 

 

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Categories: My hair, Protective Styles, Zimbabwean & African Natural Hair | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

The pros and cons of using yarn/wool in hair

2013-08-16-2077_2I haven’t seen many Zimbabwean women with yarn braids/twists etc but I have with women of other African nationalities, especially West and Central African ladies. I absolutely love them, although it’s only my second time getting them. So I decided to list the pros and cons of using yarn as a protective style:

PROS:

  1. Look like dreadlocks after a few weeks, so are more natural looking
  2. There’s room to be very creative and fun with the range of different colours acrylic yarn comes in
  3. Is gentler on hair than extensions and is lighter causing less stress to hair strands
  4. Able to keep moisture in longer than hair extension
  5. Hair can be washed, deep conditioned and treated in yarn twists/braids. In fact, washing makes the twists softer
  6. Inexpensive and yarn is easily accessible. One roll of wool in Bon Marche in Harare costs $1 of which I used three
  7. Is a protective style that can last weeks and even months if taken care of properly, but beware of hair actually locking

CONS:

  1. Can smell of mildew if not washed
  2. They easily collect lint, but this can be prevented by washing them, using a satin scarf or pillowcase at night and not using heavy cream or butter products in the hair. It’s better to use liquid based moisturisers
  3. They are heavy when wet

I haven’t had many problems with my yarn twists. Issues I had with box braids such as dry scalp, itchy scalp and scalp pain are non existent. I will review when I undo my yarn twists, but so far so good.

 

Categories: Hair tips, Protective Styles, Zimbabwean & African Natural Hair | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

My Yarn Twist Process

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This was my second attempt at yarn twists and they came out much prettier than my first attempt twists. It was my second time plaiting my hair in braids instead of getting someone else to do it too. The first time, was a lot messier because I got impatient and I was just inexperienced at doing my own hair. THe second time is much neater although I had cramps everywhere, fingers, wrists, neck, shoulders, bum, knees, you name it. It took me a whole weekend and three rolls of acrylic wool (which ended up being a little less than I actually needed).

Yarn twists/braids are basically just box braids/twists using acrylic wool instead of hair extensions.

My process of putting them in was as follows:

  • I detangled, washed, conditioned with a protein conditioner, then a moisturising conditioner and air dried my hair in braids to stretch my hair
  • Sectioned my hair into 8 manageable parts and cut strings of yarn. I wanted just a few inches longer than shoulder length twists, so I cut the wool strings quite long, about double my mid back length
  • Using my fingers (and tail comb sometimes), I made parts about 0.5inches in length and width
  • Taking four pieces of wool, I bent them in the middle to have 8 pieces then plaited the 0.5inch part rooting it by braiding a few centimetres then twisting the rest
  • When twisting, since my twists would unravel, I would twist each individual piece against itself then twist the parts around each other. I do this when I twist my own natural hair too or else the twist won’t stay put
  • I plaited from the back, my edges, then finished with the middle of my head
  • For the ends I got help to cut them straight, then using a lighter and a candle I burnt the ends

Tips for yarn twists / braids

  • Make sure you use 100% acrylic yarn and not just any wool. In Zimbabwe, most of the yarn found in the supermarkets is acrylic. Here it’s just called acrylic wool and will usually state if it’s 100%
  • Try to match the colour of your hair to the yarn to make it look natural, you can experiment and have fun with lots of other colours too
  • Keep them moisturised. I have been doing the same process of moisturising as when my hair is out.
  • Keep them clean by washing as usual, although yarn is heavy when wet
  • Make sure you continue using a satin scarf/bonet or pillowcase as usual.
Categories: Hair tips, My hair, Protective Styles, Uncategorized, Zimbabwean & African Natural Hair | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

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